10 Brilliant October Ads – Plus 1 You Have to See to Believe

It’s my favorite time again, when I get to round up the best viral ads of the month so you don’t have to. Here to showcase 11 brilliant brands are David Beckham, Rob Lowe, Sarah Silverman and more.

Mo'ne Davis Chevrolet

10. Peugeot: “208 GTI 30th”

It’s got fast cars, sophisticated men and beautiful women – the hallmarks of any showstopping advertisement. Here, Peugeot remakes a 30-year-old commercial for the GTI, with stunts even more ridiculous than the original ad.

9. The North Face: “Never Stop Exploring”

This creative commercial appeals to your inner adventurer. As shoppers peruse different coats at a North Face store, the floor disappears and shoppers are forced to climb up a bouldering wall. Once they reach the top, that perfect jakcet appears in a halo of light, dangling from the ceiling – but they can only reach it if they’re willing to jump.

8. Leica: “100”

This ad for Leica highlights some of the most iconic photos from the last 100 years. While it takes credit for each image by changing “the course of photography” (a debate for another time), it’s a fun glimpse through some of history’s most romantic, devastating and shocking moments.

7. Dove: “Legacy”

Dove is known for their real-talk real beauty campaigns, and this ad is another attempt to boost the self-esteem of women everywhere. In this touching spot, Dove shows us how we pass our insecurities down to our daughters. If we love our bodies, the next generation will love theirs.

6. Haig Club: “David Beckham’s Haig Club”

This, my friends, is the epitome of cool.

David Beckham and Guy Ritchie team up to promote Beckham’s new whiskey, Haig Club. In the advert, a glamorous group of friends travel to the world’s most scenic wonders via private jet, motorbike and convertible. The goal: to share a glass of Haig.

5. Cheerios: “André, Jonathan & Raphaëlle’s Story”

It may be a little corny, but it’s the sweetest ad you’ll see this month. Here, two dads recount their own love story, and how they adopted their cute-as-can-be daughter. As a brand, Cheerios has always focused on family first, and this series is right on point.

4. National Women’s Law Center: “Sarah Silverman Closes the Gap”

Warning: NSFW.

Sarah Silverman, advocate for the masses, undergoes a sex change operation to protest the gender pay gap. As she chooses from a selection of prosthetics, she lists some alarming statistics, including that women make an average of $500,000 less than men in their lifetime. After all, if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.

Silverman (as usual) does an excellent job of making jokes out of serious issues, but the call-to-action here is clear. Help close the pay gap by donating to EqualPaybackProject.com.

3. DirecTV: “Painfully Awkward Rob Lowe”

The best ads usually roam the internet, not TV – with the exception of these hilarious commercials. In DirecTV’s newest series, Rob Lowe plays himself, alongside less fortunate versions of himself: Creepy Rob Lowe, Less Attractive Rob Lowe and now Painfully Awkward Rob Lowe.

2. New York Organ Donor Network: “Long Live New York”

This ad wins the second spot for beautiful graphics alone. In this striking animation, New York City crumbles at its citizens’ fingertips. Building facades fall to the ground, Grand Central’s clock stops ticking, the Statue of Liberty hangs her head. The city needs a new heart, so its inhabitants construct one from the hobnob remains that scatter the streets.

Aside from the visuals and touching ending, the campaign is delightfully effective. What are you waiting for, New York? Sign up as an organ donor today at LongLiveNY.org.

1. Chevrolet: “Throw Like a Girl”

The 13-year-old Mo’ne Davis bumped Kobe Bryant, NBA MVP, off the national cover of Sports Illustrated.

Who is she? She’s the first female to throw a shutout in Little League World Series history. She pitches at 70 miles per hour; in her words, “that’s throwing like a girl!” And now, she’s a role model to athletes – boys and girls – everywhere. In this heartwarming ad, which aired during Game 1 of this year’s Giants-Royals World Series, Mo’ne tells her story, her hopes, her dreams.

But even better than the commercial is the mini-documentary behind it. Check out the full version here.

BONUS: The weirdest ad you’ve seen this year.

In an effort to show off its cool factor, Virgin America shows you an average flight through a fictitious competitor, BLAH Airlines.

The ad is a nearly six-hour pre-roll. A sane person would expect something of substance to happen in those six hours, but alas, nothing does. Instead, viewers watch riveting footage of “passengers” (and by “passengers,” I mean mannequins) staring at the seats in front of them, filling in crossword puzzles and making tedious small talk.

It certainly accomplishes its goal of highlighting Virgin’s amenities, and it’s just oddball enough to work. Though if anyone makes it through more than a minute of optional viewing, I’ll be shocked.


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